On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Test | Final Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. Which one of the following was not included by Aristotle in the forms of surprises he mentioned?
(a) Puns.
(b) Riddles.
(c) Word-plays.
(d) Limericks.

2. In what way did Aristotle indicate refutative enthymemes were more effective in Book II, Chapter 26?
(a) Metaphorically.
(b) Hypothetically.
(c) Literally.
(d) Rhetorically.

3. What did the paean avoid in order to gain Aristotle's endorsement as the ideal rhythm for prose?
(a) An uncommon meter.
(b) An indefinite meter.
(c) A common meter.
(d) A definite meter.

4. In order to object to an argument using Aristotle's explanations, how might it be attacked?
(a) Humorously.
(b) Scientifically.
(c) Rationally.
(d) Directly.

5. According to Aristotle, what was the general difference between enthymemes and examples?
(a) Enthymemes were more persuasive than examples.
(b) Both enthymemes and examples were just as persuasive.
(c) Examples were more persuasive than enthymemes.
(d) Neither enthymemes nor examples were persuasive.

6. Why did Aristotle prefer the periodic prose to the free-running prose?
(a) Periodic prose was easier to use.
(b) Periodic prose was more familiar.
(c) Free-running prose had fallen out of fashion.
(d) Free-running prose had just been introduced.

7. To object to an argument, whose authority did Aristotle think could be appealed to?
(a) A respected writer or lawyer.
(b) A well known writer or lawyer.
(c) A well known writer or judge.
(d) A respected writer or judge.

8. As explained by Aristotle in Book III, Chapter 2, which type of words should a speech writer use?
(a) Words that are easily pronounced.
(b) Words whose meanings are obvious.
(c) Words that are not easily pronounced.
(d) Words whose meanings are not obvious.

9. What was thought to be incorrect about the example of the misuse of the epithet that Aristotle provided?
(a) An extraordinary verb was applied to an ordinary noun.
(b) An extraordinary adjective was applied to an ordinary noun.
(c) An ordinary adjective was applied to an extraordinary noun.
(d) An ordinary verb was applied to an extraordinary noun.

10. In Aristotle's opinion, why were many people not swayed by sound arguments?
(a) They were too emotional.
(b) They were not emotional enough.
(c) They were too educated.
(d) They were too uneducated.

11. As discussed in Book III, Chapter 12, what should legal rhetoric blend argumentation with?
(a) A familiar style.
(b) A familiar delivery.
(c) Effective style.
(d) Effective delivery.

12. Why did Aristotle say that metaphors were useful in a speech?
(a) They sounded natural to mostly everyone.
(b) They sounded natural to everyone.
(c) They were not used frequently in common speech.
(d) They were used frequently in common speech.

13. In order for an enthymeme to be successful, what recommendation did Aristotle have about its conclusion?
(a) It should be long.
(b) It should be obvious.
(c) It should be short.
(d) It should not be obvious.

14. According to Aristotle, how did people in their prime view success?
(a) It was not possible.
(b) It was not impossible.
(c) It was probable.
(d) It was not improbable.

15. According to Aristotle, what should vivid descriptions always depict?
(a) Something that is not easily identified.
(b) Something that is easily identified.
(c) Something that is in activity.
(d) Something that is stationary.

Short Answer Questions

1. How did Aristotle define a maxim?

2. Which one of the following was not included by Aristotle in Book III, Chapter 4, in his discussion of what differentiated a simile from a metaphor?

3. What did Aristotle think was wrong with the metaphor that compared a man with a square?

4. According to Aristotle, how many ways could objections be raised?

5. Continuing the theme of Aristotle's logic, what could be used to deduce the impossible?

(see the answer keys)

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