On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Test | Final Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. How did Aristotle define a maxim?
(a) A series of long statements about impractical conduct.
(b) A long statement about impractical conduct.
(c) A short statement about practical conduct.
(d) A series of short statements about practical conduct.

2. What did Aristotle think was wrong with the metaphor that compared a man with a square?
(a) He thought it was too simple.
(b) He thought it was boring.
(c) He thought it was confusing.
(d) He thought it was too complex.

3. Why did Aristotle consider metaphors to be useful in Book III, Chapter 10?
(a) People connect with sensible ideas.
(b) People enjoy thoughtful ideas.
(c) People connect with similar ideas.
(d) People enjoy new ideas.

4. In Aristotle's opinion, what should a good birth lead to?
(a) Wealth.
(b) Ambition.
(c) Optimism.
(d) Balance.

5. In order for an enthymeme to be successful, what recommendation did Aristotle have about its conclusion?
(a) It should be short.
(b) It should be obvious.
(c) It should be long.
(d) It should not be obvious.

6. Why did Aristotle prefer the periodic prose to the free-running prose?
(a) Free-running prose had fallen out of fashion.
(b) Periodic prose was more familiar.
(c) Periodic prose was easier to use.
(d) Free-running prose had just been introduced.

7. Which one of the following was not included by Aristotle in his description of young people?
(a) Courageous.
(b) Independent.
(c) Active.
(d) Bold.

8. How were antithesis sayings defined by Aristotle?
(a) The grouping of two opposite qualities.
(b) The reference to three slightly different ideas.
(c) The grouping of two similar qualities.
(d) The reference to three vastly different ideas.

9. What did Aristotle think orators should be careful of when writing their speeches?
(a) To make them over ten minutes in length.
(b) Not to make them overly poetic.
(c) To make them under ten minutes in length.
(d) Not to make them overly informative.

10. According to Aristotle, what was epideictic rhetoric most likely to deal with?
(a) Small crowds of educated people.
(b) Large crowds of educated people.
(c) Large crowds of uneducated people.
(d) Small crowds of uneducated people.

11. How did Aristotle describe the difference between spoken and written prose?
(a) Written prose was generally more stylized and complicated.
(b) Spoken prose was generally more stylized and complicated.
(c) Spoken prose was generally more stylized and less complicated.
(d) Written prose was generally more stylized and less complicated.

12. Why was a refutative enthymeme considered to be more effective by Aristotle?
(a) It was more concise and more elegant.
(b) It was more concise and less elegant.
(c) It was less concise and more elegant.
(d) It was less concise and less elegant.

13. What was Aristotle's opinion about using compound words in a speech?
(a) Most were acceptable if they were used correctly.
(b) They should generally be used.
(c) Some were acceptable if they were used correctly.
(d) They should generally be avoided.

14. Based on Aristotle's discussion of objections, what would be the purpose in making a similar appeal to an argument?
(a) To complicate it.
(b) To overshadow it.
(c) To contradict it.
(d) To simplify it.

15. Which one of the following was not included in Aristotle's recommendations for orators on how to write and speak their arguments?
(a) Non-logical means.
(b) Eloquent style.
(c) Convincing delivery.
(d) Abundance of detail.

Short Answer Questions

1. What shape was described in the example Aristotle provided for the use of description in an impressive speech?

2. According to Aristotle, how did people in their prime view success?

3. As discussed in Book III, Chapter 12, what should legal rhetoric blend argumentation with?

4. In comparison to a spoken speech, how did Aristotle think a written speech would often appear?

5. Following the example given in Book II, Chapter 24, what false assumption could be made by describing a large crowd?

(see the answer keys)

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