On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What did Aristotle think was the intent of all voluntary actions?
(a) Some apparent recognition or pleasure.
(b) Some apparent good or recognition.
(c) Some apparent good, recognition, or pleasure.
(d) Some apparent good or pleasure.

2. How did Aristotle define calmness?
(a) The same as normal.
(b) The same as boredom.
(c) The opposite of anger.
(d) The opposite of excitement.

3. What was the difference between rhetoric and dialectic in the logical appeal?
(a) The timing of the argument.
(b) There was no difference between them.
(c) The length of the speech.
(d) The methods used.

4. As explained by Aristotle in Book I, Chapter 10, what was the concern of the legal rhetorician?
(a) Only disproving wrongdoing.
(b) Neither proving nor disproving wrongdoing.
(c) Only proving wrongdoing.
(d) Either proving or disproving wrongdoing.

5. Which one of the following could be an example of the emotional appeal?
(a) Making the audience think about a different point of view.
(b) Making the audience angry to fight a war.
(c) Making the audience tired of listening to the speech.
(d) Making the audience doubt their own point of view.

6. Besides goodness itself, what else did Aristotle indicate a political orator must deal with?
(a) Its origin.
(b) Its substance.
(c) Its destination.
(d) Its degree.

7. How did Aristotle explain the binding extent of contracts?
(a) Only between two individuals.
(b) They were not binding.
(c) Only between the courts and an individual.
(d) Only between two individuals or the courts and an individual.

8. How did Aristotle differentiate between crime and punishment?
(a) Crime and punishment were immediate.
(b) Crime and punishment were remote.
(c) Crime was immediate while punishment was remote.
(d) Crime was remote while punishment was immediate.

9. As explained in Book II, Chapter 4, what type of friends were people most likely to choose?
(a) Ones that had a different social or economic status.
(b) Ones that associated with people different from them.
(c) Ones that had a similar social or economic status.
(d) Ones that associated with the same people as them.

10. What did Aristotle think anger was always directed towards?
(a) A group of people.
(b) A specific person.
(c) A specific person or group, or a specific circumstance.
(d) A specific circumstance.

11. Based on Aristotle's explanation, why was it not possible to be angry at humanity in general?
(a) Because it was impossible for humanity to have wronged a single person.
(b) Because it was impossible for a single person to understand any unfairness by humanity.
(c) Because it was impossible for humanity to be unfair in general.
(d) Because it was impossible for humanity to have incited fear from a single person.

12. How many causes of human action did Aristotle detail in Book I, Chapter 10?
(a) Ten.
(b) Five.
(c) Eight.
(d) Seven.

13. What was included in the special laws referenced by Aristotle?
(a) Some of the logical opinions of a political body.
(b) Some of the explicit statutes of a political body.
(c) All of the logical opinions of a political body.
(d) All of the explicit statutes of a political body.

14. Which of the following were examples of the involuntary causes for human action that Aristotle outlined?
(a) Luck, habit, and compulsion.
(b) Luck, nature, and compulsion.
(c) Luck, nature, and habit.
(d) Luck, nature, habit, and compulsion.

15. Why did Aristotle think the political rhetorician should show that their proposal was in line with the audience's happiness?
(a) To help them understand it.
(b) To encourage them to consider it.
(c) To prevent them from forgetting it.
(d) To convince them to accept it.

Short Answer Questions

1. How did Aristotle think the political orator should be able to speak about the good?

2. When did Aristotle think "what is good" made one happy?

3. In contrast to syllogism, how did Aristotle explain the difference between the arguments in enthymemes?

4. Why did Aristotle think the universal law was higher than the special law?

5. In the beginning of the book, which one of the following did Aristotle indicate about rhetoric?

(see the answer keys)

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