On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. Why did Aristotle think the completion of a difficult task was pleasant?
(a) What is difficult to get is always better than what is easy to get.
(b) What is diffcult to get requires dedication that makes it more rewarding.
(c) What is difficult to get requires extra effort that makes it more rewarding.
(d) What is difficult to get is mostly better than what is easy to get.

2. How many different subjects of political oratory did Aristotle discuss in Book I, Chapter 4?
(a) Two.
(b) Four.
(c) Five.
(d) Three.

3. In contrast to syllogism, how did Aristotle explain the difference between the arguments in enthymemes?
(a) They were less formal.
(b) They were more specific.
(c) They were more formal.
(d) They were less specific.

4. Which tactic was not included as something that an epideictic rhetorician might use?
(a) Comparison.
(b) Amplification.
(c) Competition.
(d) Exaggeration.

5. In Aristotle's opinion, which things did a criminal consider when choosing their victim?
(a) Vulnerability, value, and convenience.
(b) Vulnerability and convenience.
(c) Value and convenience.
(d) Vulnerability and value.

6. According to Aristotle, what act should the political rhetorician be concerned with?
(a) The act of rejection.
(b) The act of limitation.
(c) The act of legislation.
(d) The act of ratification.

7. Concerning the elicitation of the praise or blame of an audience, what was epideictic rhetoric also called by Aristotle?
(a) Irresponsible.
(b) Unceremonial.
(c) Responsible.
(d) Ceremonial.

8. As explained by Aristotle, what comprised good?
(a) Many different things.
(b) A few different things.
(c) Only one main thing.
(d) Only two main things.

9. In Aristotle's description of fear, what was the opposite of fear?
(a) Knowledge.
(b) Confidence.
(c) Ability.
(d) Friendship.

10. Which cause of human action did Aristotle mention as always being unpleasant?
(a) Anger.
(b) Habit.
(c) Appetite.
(d) Compulsion.

11. What definition did Aristotle provide for rhetoric in Book I, Chapter 2?
(a) The faculty of observe in only certain cases the means of conversation.
(b) The faculty of observe in only certain cases the means of persuasion.
(c) The faculty of observe in any given case the means of conversation.
(d) The faculty of observe in any given case the means of persuasion.

12. What was the difference between rhetoric and dialectic in the logical appeal?
(a) The methods used.
(b) The length of the speech.
(c) The timing of the argument.
(d) There was no difference between them.

13. Based on the information in Book I, Chapter1, for which side(s) of a question could rhetoric allow a person to make good cases?
(a) Both sides.
(b) The side that the person disagreed with.
(c) Neither side.
(d) The side that the person agreed with.

14. Which one of the following was not listed by Aristotle as a form of happiness?
(a) Reputation.
(b) Popularity.
(c) Honor.
(d) Virtue.

15. What did Aristotle think was irrelevant to the feeling of indignation?
(a) Social status.
(b) Unearned fortune.
(c) Outrage.
(d) Anger.

Short Answer Questions

1. According to Aristotle, how could a person defend their position in the future when they discovered the truth of a question?

2. Which of the following did Aristotle think were more likely to commit crimes?

3. What was another word used for "legal" in Aristotle's discussion of legal rhetoric?

4. In dealing with just and unjust actions, how did Aristotle indicate the law could be considered?

5. Considering Aristotle's views in Book I, Chapter 2, how would the emotional appeal move an audience?

(see the answer keys)

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