On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. In comparison to the other appeals, how much did Aristotle think that rhetoric resembled the dialectic in the logical appeal?
(a) Rhetoric resembled dialectic the same in the logical appeal.
(b) Rhetoric resembled dialectic exactly in the logical appeal.
(c) Rhetoric resembled dialectic the least in the logical appeal.
(d) Rhetoric most closely resembled dialectic in the logical appeal.

2. What did Aristotle think a political orator should be aware of?
(a) Only their country's exports.
(b) Their country's imports and exports.
(c) Only their country's imports.
(d) Neither their country's imports nor its exports.

3. How many causes of human action did Aristotle detail in Book I, Chapter 10?
(a) Seven.
(b) Five.
(c) Ten.
(d) Eight.

4. As explained in Book I, Chapter 3, which type of rhetoric attempted to convince a legislature to take a particular action?
(a) National.
(b) Tactical.
(c) Political.
(d) Non-political.

5. What did Aristotle say could not be considered good?
(a) Something that is dependent on something else.
(b) Something that is relied upon by something else.
(c) Something that is supplemental to something else.
(d) Something that is instrumental to something else.

6. From the information in Book II, Chapter 1, what should a speaker do in order to put the audience in a certain frame of mind?
(a) Compliment them.
(b) Manipulate their emotions.
(c) Challenge them.
(d) Ask them questions.

7. Which type of disgraces made shame especially significant in Aristotle's opinion?
(a) Financial.
(b) Moral.
(c) Collective.
(d) Individual.

8. With the ethical appeal, what would the speaker be attempting to convey to the audience?
(a) Their own virtue or experiences.
(b) Their own virtue, experiences, or authority.
(c) Their own experiences or authority.
(d) Their own virtue or authority.

9. How did Aristotle think the speaker should present themselves to the audience?
(a) In a way that inspired knowledge.
(b) In a way that inspired trust.
(c) In a way that appeared to be above the audience.
(d) In a way that appeared to be on the same level as the audience.

10. How did Aristotle think rhetoric could be useful in terms of one's beliefs?
(a) Explanation.
(b) Expansion.
(c) Confirmation.
(d) Refinement.

11. As explained by Aristotle in Book I, Chapter 10, what was the concern of the legal rhetorician?
(a) Only disproving wrongdoing.
(b) Either proving or disproving wrongdoing.
(c) Only proving wrongdoing.
(d) Neither proving nor disproving wrongdoing.

12. Which kind of distinction was made by Aristotle between war and peace, and national defense?
(a) Subtle.
(b) Distinct.
(c) Complicated.
(d) No difference.

13. How many different subjects of political oratory did Aristotle discuss in Book I, Chapter 4?
(a) Four.
(b) Three.
(c) Two.
(d) Five.

14. What did Aristotle think the extent of virtues was based on?
(a) Certain circumstances.
(b) Certain accomplishments.
(c) Past associations.
(d) Past actions.

15. How did Aristotle explain the binding extent of contracts?
(a) Only between two individuals or the courts and an individual.
(b) They were not binding.
(c) Only between two individuals.
(d) Only between the courts and an individual.

Short Answer Questions

1. According to Aristotle, what was the orator's chief goal?

2. According to Aristotle, what was the most basic cause of pleasure?

3. Which of the following did Aristotle think were more likely to commit crimes?

4. According to Aristotle, how could a person defend their position in the future when they discovered the truth of a question?

5. What type of resources available to the government did Aristotle mention in Book I, Chapter 4?

(see the answer keys)

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