On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Quiz | Eight Week Quiz D

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This quiz consists of 5 multiple choice and 5 short answer questions through Book II, Chapters 1-11.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. According to Aristotle, what was the most basic cause of pleasure?
(a) Some kind of action in accordance with one's nature.
(b) Some kind of action in accordance with one's desires.
(c) Some kind of action in accordance with one's abilities.
(d) Some kind of action in accordance with one's instincts.

2. In what type of person did Aristotle explain there was an especially strong temptation to commit crimes?
(a) Someone that has already committed a crime and has been caught, but not convicted.
(b) Someone that was unaware of the punishment for committing a crime.
(c) Someone that has already committed a crime, but has not been caught.
(d) Someone that has never committed a crime.

3. From the information in Book II, Chapter 1, what should a speaker do in order to put the audience in a certain frame of mind?
(a) Ask them questions.
(b) Challenge them.
(c) Manipulate their emotions.
(d) Compliment them.

4. Why did Aristotle think the political rhetorician should show that their proposal was in line with the audience's happiness?
(a) To convince them to accept it.
(b) To help them understand it.
(c) To encourage them to consider it.
(d) To prevent them from forgetting it.

5. What did Aristotle say could not be considered good?
(a) Something that is instrumental to something else.
(b) Something that is dependent on something else.
(c) Something that is relied upon by something else.
(d) Something that is supplemental to something else.

Short Answer Questions

1. Based on Aristotle's explanation, why was it not possible to be angry at humanity in general?

2. To Aristotle, when did anger take place?

3. According to Aristotle in Book I, Chapter 1, what was not a concern of rhetoric?

4. Concerning the elicitation of the praise or blame of an audience, what was epideictic rhetoric also called by Aristotle?

5. Why did Aristotle think the universal law was higher than the special law?

(see the answer key)

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