A Nation Under Our Feet: Black Political Struggles in the Rural South from Slavery to the Great Migration Test | Mid-Book Test - Easy

Steven Hahn
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This test consists of 15 multiple choice questions and 5 short answer questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. As the Union Army moved further into the South, the volume of slave fugitives ___________.
(a) Stayed the same.
(b) Was not measured.
(c) Decreased.
(d) Increased.

2. Military district commanders worked to educate and protect ______________, who did not understand the process or feared consequences.
(a) Women and children.
(b) People in power.
(c) Each other.
(d) Freed men.

3. What kind of winds blew into the United States during the 1850s, according to Hahn's book?
(a) Strong.
(b) Conservative.
(c) Weak.
(d) Liberal.

4. Any action undertaken by African Americans needed to be taken as a ______________ so as to avoid punishment.
(a) Collective.
(b) Political movement.
(c) Secret.
(d) Risk.

5. Freedmen also resisted the threats of white _________, marched to the polls, and helped write new state constitutions.
(a) Republicans.
(b) Bosses.
(c) Senators.
(d) Democrats.

6. The time period of the book is a time when African American men won and lost the right to __________.
(a) Be free.
(b) Get married.
(c) Vote.
(d) Own land.

7. _________ was another way that slaves earned goods and money and increased their leverage.
(a) Marriage.
(b) Sexual favors.
(c) Good behavior.
(d) Ritual gifting.

8. Freed people played important roles in the early quests for land _______________.
(a) Reassignment.
(b) Purchases.
(c) Territories.
(d) Independence.

9. In the rural South, instead of petitions and calls for equality, mutually reinforcing _________ spread about either the federal government's future or insurrections.
(a) Laws.
(b) Rumors.
(c) Pamphlets.
(d) Conventions.

10. Some ___________ began pooling their resources in hopes of buying or leasing land that had been confiscated.
(a) Freed people.
(b) Church leaders.
(c) Women.
(d) Slave owners.

11. Hahn learned that in ________, Mississippi, freedmen and women were driving their employers to distraction in 1868.
(a) Chattanooga.
(b) Woodville.
(c) Memphis.
(d) Biloxi.

12. Those slaves who remained in the south began to take over their master's "____________" plantations.
(a) Larger.
(b) Abandoned.
(c) Burned down.
(d) Free.

13. Hahn became interested in the history of African American struggles when he came across an account of African American __________ resistance.
(a) Voting.
(b) Political.
(c) Education.
(d) Labor.

14. An aspect that has often been overlooked in the literature on slavery is ____________ between slaves.
(a) Exchanges.
(b) Committments.
(c) Dispute resolution.
(d) Infighting.

15. Rural freed people did not need outsiders to nurture their desire for the _________ they had been cultivating.
(a) Land.
(b) Homes.
(c) Power.
(d) Money.

Short Answer Questions

1. Hahn sees his book as encompassing collective struggled for social and meaningful ____________.

2. The __________ process helped to illuminate who the leaders were within black communities.

3. Plantation ________, who wielded the most power within the community, tended to be male.

4. David Medlock was an African American leader in the state of _____________.

5. Some slaveholders began offering their slaves small ___________ in order to keep them on the plantations.

(see the answer keys)

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