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Under Fire Test | Final Test - Hard

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 136 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
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Final Test - Hard

Name: _____________________________ Period: ___________________________

This quiz consists of 5 short answer questions and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What does Cocon calculate about the squad?



2. Why does Joseph Mesnil go into "no man's land"?



3. What does the Foreign Legionnaire try to give to his comrade?



4. How does Lamuse find Eudoxie's corpse?



5. What do the men think of all of the things that the army issues them?



Essay Topics

Lamuse is a unique character with strange, but internally consistent behavior. He is eccentric, but extremely loyal to his squad. Among the many normal men the narrator describes being drawn into the war, Lamuse learns to adapt well and demonstrates his strong character at many points in the novel.

Part 1) Describe Lamuse as a character. Who is he? Where does he come from? What is his appearance? What are his personality traits?

Part 2) The narrator often uses comparisons to various animals to describe Lamuse. Cite some of these examples and explain their purpose. What do these comparisons establish about Lamuse?

Part 3) Explain some of Lamuse's eccentricities and odd behavior, as well as some ways that he demonstrates his loyalty and dedication to the squad.

The scale of the war is important to many themes in the novel, and the men of the squad have opportunities to glimpse a portion of its full size. The strategic development of deep fronts that are hundreds of miles long necessitates huge armies, and the drive for advanced and numerically superior firepower requires volumes of weapons and material. The scale of the war makes it difficult for the men to fully understand, and it makes them uninformed pawns in a game far too large to be seen from ground-level.

Part 1) Cite examples from the book to explain how the author establishes the size and scale of the war.

Part 2) Discuss the impact of the scale of the war on the men of Bertrand's squad.

Part 3) Based on information in the book, and in particular the analysis of logical men like Cocon and Bertrand, speculate about the factors that contribute to the necessity of the large force sizes seen in the novel.

Throughout the novel, many opinions of the poilus are articulated indirectly. The perspective always stays with the men of Bertrand's squad and almost always with the narrator, but through the experiences of these men, the perceptions of many other people towards the poilus becomes clear.

Part 1) Explain how the poilus, and particularly groups like Bertrand's squad, who have spent a great deal of time in the trenches, are perceived by the more active forces, such as other formations that are on the march, or the Moroccan Division.

Part 2) Describe the shirker's attitudes towards the poilus. How are these attitudes shaped by the shirker's own failures and vices?

Part 3) Explain how the civilians and journalists see the poilus. How are these perceptions shaped by this group's desire to support the war?

(see the answer keys)

This section contains 578 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
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Under Fire from BookRags. ©2009 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
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