The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture Chapter Abstracts for Teachers

Frank R. Wilson
This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 132 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
Buy The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture Lesson Plans

Chapter Abstracts

Prologue and Dawn

• Hands and arms come to life before we wake. Wilson plans to show the physical roots of human creative work.

• He shows the anthropological and evolutionary views, bio mechanical and physiological characteristics, and neuro behavioral and developmental perspectives.

• Wilson argues that the human brain is permanently immature but that people are born resourceful and with experience become skillful and thoughtful.

• "Lucy" lived 3.2 millions years ago. Her hand is not ape-like, but her brain is the size of a chimpanzee brain.

• That the brain and musculoskeletal systems evolve by changing structure and function over time distinguishes a tool-using hominid.

• Bipedal gait and upper arm changes and the driving force of the hominid's brain also distinguish tool-using hominids.

• Wilson claims, though, that the brain is the last organ to evolve after the hominids become tool users.

• Brain and behavior evolves from primitive tool use like rock-pounding and...

(read more Chapter Abstracts)

This section contains 2,663 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture Lesson Plans
Copyrights
BookRags
The Hand: How Its Use Shapes the Brain, Language, and Human Culture from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.