The Discourses Test | Lesson Plans Mid-Book Test - Medium

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Mid-Book Test - Medium

Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 multiple choice questions, 5 short answer questions, and 10 short essay questions.

Multiple Choice Questions

1. What is an obvious counterpoint to Machiavelli's assertion to the benefits of the power of the Caesars to the Roman Empire?
(a) If the Nobles of Rome had not sought to possess distant provinces, there would have been no need for Caesars.
(b) Without the Caesars, provinces of the Empire would have moved to avoid hazards.
(c) The cost of Empire caused hazards to gather domestically as well as throughout the Empire.
(d) Without the empire is it possible that the hazards the empire faced would not have materialized.

2. What are the two important items that Machiavelli considers to be unwise for a Prince to put entirely into peril?
(a) His fortune and forces.
(b) His reputation and family.
(c) His city and his chief advisers.
(d) His fortune and his reputation.

3. What does Machiavelli identify as tactics the Citizen seeking not to be harmed uses?
(a) Friendships with Citizens who are bold enough to fight.
(b) Acquiring friendships either through honest means or by supplying money to protect themselves from the powerful (bribes).
(c) Obscurity.
(d) The financial ability to buy protection.

4. What, according to Machiavelli in Book , 1 Section 38, is the fate of irresolute Republics?
(a) They will eventually fade away and reemerge as a tyranny.
(b) They face invasion, destruction and anhilation.
(c) They have no alternative but to join alliances with powerful Republics that will take control of them.
(d) They cannot settle conflicts except with force because their weakness prevents them from resolving doubts over issues.

5. In Book 1, Section 46, Machiavelli credits the ruin of Republics on citizens who jump from one ambition to another. What was the phrase that Sallust put in the mouth of Caesar that explains how such ambitions begin?
(a) "Beware the Ides of March."
(b) "All evil examples have their origins in good beginnings."
(c) "I see the better things, and approve; I follow the worse."
(d) "Vini. Vidi. Vici."

Short Answer Questions

1. What is a Prince as Machiavelli uses the term?

2. Of what should Princes be most ashamed in Machiavelli's view?

3. According to Machiavelli, what caused so much hard work for Rome as it expanded its Empire to distant provinces?

4. From what did Machiavelli develop the information that he wrote into "The Discourses"?

5. What was the inspiration for Machiavelli's "The Discourses"?

Short Essay Questions

1. What acts by governing officials does Machiavelli consider "pernicious" or damaging to the authority of the government?

2. What does Machiavelli recommend to Captains as an element of strategy to assure success in capturing a town?

3. From what did Niccolo Machiavelli make the present that he sent to Zanobi Buondelmonti and Cosimo Rucellai?

4. What does Machiavelli advise those who seek to change a Republic?

5. What is the advice that Machiavelli gives to Princes who take possessions from another Prince?

6. Why did "Captains of Fortune" favor cavalry over infantry?

7. What does Machiavelli mean when he advises that evil in a State be "temporized"?

8. What does Machiavelli recommend to be done if one wants to establish a Republic where it does not exist?

9. What does Machiavelli claim to be the practice of writers of history who, "...so obey the fortune of the winners...?"

10. What does Machiavelli claim proves the Romans' love for liberty?

(see the answer keys)

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Science and Its Times
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