Feminist Theory from Margin to Center Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What is the main relationship discussed in Chapter 5?

2. How were black women's efforts received by white feminists?

3. The author cites Lillian Hellman's autobiography as an example of what kind of phenomenon?

4. The phrase "suffering cannot be measured and compared quantitatively" comes from which of the following authors?

5. What is the definition of feminism proposed by the author?

Short Essay Questions

1. What differences and similarities does the author see between black men and white men?

2. Is true sisterhood, i.e. solidarity in the struggle to achieve feminist goals, supported by society, according to the author?

3. Compare the Preface to the second edition with Ch. 12: What similarities do you see regarding the author's vision for the future of the feminist movement? List two to three examples.

4. Describe the author's personal experiences with feminists from the same background as Friedan. How did they initially respond to her attempts to contribute to the conversation around feminist theory?

5. Does the author offer her own definition of feminism in Chapter Two, and if so, what is it?

6. List several other critiques of violence that the author offers.

7. Is there a note of caution in the author's tone regarding the extent to which the system of power has actually changed? Where?

8. In the 2000 Preface is the author's attitude towards change in the feminist movement positive or negative, and what examples does she give?

9. Does the author mention different branches of the feminist movement in Chapter Eight, and if so what kind of relationship do they have?

10. Are there tensions around female heterosexuality within the feminist movement?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

Essay on Ch. 12: The process of feminist-oriented change.

The final chapter of the book looks at the process of feminist-oriented change and what is required to enact that change. This essay will provide an overview of the author's critiques and her prescriptions for revolutionary feminist change.

1) Discuss the author's analysis of early feminist approaches to creating change. In what way do these approaches fall short?

2) Discuss the author's recommendation for enacting change: What kind of social analysis does the author call for? What kind of action does she call for?

3) Discuss the author's view of the process of change: What attitude is called for? Why is the process of change difficult for Americans in particular?

4) Do you believe that the change the author calls for is possible?

Essay Topic 2

Essay on Ch. 3: Struggle against oppression.

In Ch. 3 the author argues against prioritizing struggles against different forms of prejudice and oppression.

1) Present some of the arguments by other writers that the author engages with and refutes regarding the prioritization of one struggle over another. What holes does she find in their logic?

2) Next, outline the authors ideas on this subject, paying attention to specific connections she makes in the text. How does the author link all these struggles together?

Essay Topic 3

Essay on the two Prefaces, Ch. 12, and the book as a unit: Personal review of the book.

In the two Prefaces, the author introduces the notion of revolutionary feminism. She explains what it is and why U.S. feminism has not created revolutionary change. The author reintroduces the term in Ch. 12.

1) Review the homework in which you discussed the term "revolutionary." Has your understanding of the author's definition of revolutionary feminism expanded after reading the book? How?

2) Do you feel that the book itself is revolutionary?

3) Do you see any areas of the book that seem contradictory?

4) Does the book ultimately achieve its objective of being accessible to everyone?

5) Does society still need books such as this one to provide a "guiding light" for social change?

(see the answer keys)

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