Feminist Theory from Margin to Center Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

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This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. How does the author describe Betty Friedan in Chapter 1?

2. How does the author view women's desires and attempts to be like white men?

3. In the Preface to the second edition (2000), how does the author describe the original reception of her book?

4. What belief about men did early feminists act out, according to the author.

5. Who has portrayed the relationship between feminism and the family in this way? (See question # 61)

Short Essay Questions

1. Do early feminists beliefs about violence support traditional patriarchal concepts of gender?

2. What differences and similarities does the author see between black men and white men?

3. In the author's view, is idealism enough to enact needed changes?

4. Which two kinds of power does the author discuss in Chapter Six, "Changing Perspectives on Power"?

5. Who harbors sexist attitudes and what can be done about it?

6. What does the author say about feminist writer Betty Friedan's book The Feminine Mystique?

7. Why is educating women a "feminist agenda," as the title to Chapter Eight suggests?

8. Does the author offer any ideas about how to create sisterhood?

9. What reasons does the author give for people finding themselves at the center of society?

10. Describe the early feminist view on parenting stated in Chapter Ten, "Revolutionary Parenting."

Essay Topics

Essay Topic 1

Essay on Ch. 7: Women and work.

The author claims that bourgeois feminist's idealization of work alienated many women of color and working class women.

1) How is the early feminist view of work defined by race and class?

2) What were the experiences of many women of color and working class women? What alternatives do they have when the workplace turns out to be a place of discrimination and hierarchy?

3) Do you feel that we live in an equal opportunity society, or are opportunities still affected by a person's gender, race, and class? Provide examples for your argument.

Essay Topic 2

Essay on Ch. 9: The nature of violence against women.

One of the author's critiques of mainstream feminism is that it was sometimes unable to focus on transforming traditional views on gender, but instead reacted against them. For example, in her discussion of sisterhood in Ch.4, the author notes how early feminists built a notion of sisterhood around a shared sense of victimization. This view did not necessarily rethink the patriarchal dichotomy of victim and aggressor. In Ch. 9, the author notes something similar when she analyzes early feminist views on the nature of violence against women.

1) Discuss what the author means when she says that the practice of violence against women is a manifestation and perpetuation of traditional patriarchal thought, i.e. views on gender. What qualities do men and women possess according to this view. Does this view appear to make violence against women seem normal?

2) How did early feminists perceive the problem of violence against women, and what is the author's critique of their view?

3) Is violence limited to men, in the author's view? Whose problem is violence and how must the phenomenon be addressed in our society?

Essay Topic 3

Essay on the two Prefaces, Ch. 12, and the book as a unit: Personal review of the book.

In the two Prefaces, the author introduces the notion of revolutionary feminism. She explains what it is and why U.S. feminism has not created revolutionary change. The author reintroduces the term in Ch. 12.

1) Review the homework in which you discussed the term "revolutionary." Has your understanding of the author's definition of revolutionary feminism expanded after reading the book? How?

2) Do you feel that the book itself is revolutionary?

3) Do you see any areas of the book that seem contradictory?

4) Does the book ultimately achieve its objective of being accessible to everyone?

5) Does society still need books such as this one to provide a "guiding light" for social change?

(see the answer keys)

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