On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse - Book III, Chapter 10-12 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 30 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of On Rhetoric.
This section contains 342 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Study Guide

Book III, Chapter 10-12 Summary and Analysis

Chapter 10: Effective prose will express its important points with succinct, elegant sayings. These sayings are characterized by antithesis, metaphor, and vividness. Antithesis is the grouping of two opposite qualities in order to make a point especially striking. For example, one might say that a certain public figure is "not a savior, but a traitor"—in one short phrase, the audience is forced to imagine two completely opposite extremes. Metaphors are useful because people take pleasure in new ideas and they are the best vehicles for conveying them. Simple words convey what people already know and complex, foreign words only confuse them. Vivid speech—speech which, so to speak, draws a picture for the audience, is very effective.

Chapter 11: Vivid descriptions should always draw a picture of something that is in activity. One might...

(read more from the Book III, Chapter 10-12 Summary)

This section contains 342 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
On Rhetoric: A Theory of Civic Discourse from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook