Women and World War I - Research Article from Americans at War

Angela Huth
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Women and World War I.
This section contains 929 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Women and World War I

The status of women had risen so high by 1917 that public opinion for the first time recognized a women's voice in public affairs. Two main themes were central. The suffrage movement was building rapidly, pushing eastward from its base in California and the western states. Carrie Chapman Catt, as president of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, was a key leader, as the suffragists organized in hundreds of cities in every state. The second main theme was pacifism. Jane Addams, the Chicago social worker, was perhaps the foremost spokesperson for opposition to war, as head of the International Congress of Women for Permanent Peace. Pressures toward war proved irresistible. President Woodrow Wilson deliberately appealed to the pacifist vision by promising this would be a war to end all wars. The one woman in Congress, Representative Jeanette Rankin, Democrat of Montana...

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This section contains 929 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Women and World War I Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Women and World War I from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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