Medieval Europe 814-1450: Philosophy - Research Article from Arts and Humanities Through the Eras

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The Conservative Reaction and the Condemnation of 1277

Bonaventure and the "Augustinians."

Even as Aristotle's naturalistic philosophy became foundational to university curricula, there was strong resistance to his ideas. Historians, with their penchant for labeling, have called this group "Augustinians," but in truth the term came to identify a whole complex set of teachings, not all the same. The most articulate of the group was Bonaventure (1217–1274), third successor of St. Francis as Minister General of the Friars Minor or, more popularly, the Franciscans. In the prologue to his major theological work, his Commentary on the Sentences, Bonaventure declares that he has no wish to be an innovator, that he wishes only to follow in the footsteps of the great St. Augustine, who not only is a valid guide for the things here below (the extent of Aristotle's competence) but is also master...

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This section contains 1,561 words
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Buy the Medieval Europe 814-1450: Philosophy Encyclopedia Article
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Arts and Humanities Through the Eras
Medieval Europe 814-1450: Philosophy from Arts and Humanities Through the Eras. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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