Medicine, World War I - Research Article from Americans at War

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Triage

From the French word trier "to sort out," triage means to sort casualties of war or other wounded persons according to the seriousness of their injuries, the need for immediate treatment, and the availability of a place for treatment. This medical prioritization system was developed during World War I, when there were usually not enough doctors or medical supplies at field hospitals. Physicians and support personnel had to balance time-consuming and high-intensity treatment against treating the lightly wounded in order to send them back to their military units. Later The Geneva Convention for the Protection of War Victims: Armed Forces in the Field, one of the four Geneva Conventions of 1949, would stipulate: "Only urgent medical reasons will authorize priority in the order of treatment to be administered." Triage procedures are also used today in hospital emergency rooms and in disaster relief situations.

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This section contains 1,100 words
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Buy the Medicine, World War I Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Medicine, World War I from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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