The Memorandum Test | Final Test - Hard

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 148 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
Buy The Memorandum Lesson Plans
Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 short answer questions and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. Who passes through the lecture as Lear is talking?

2. Who does Ballas attempt to blame for the Ptydepe fiasco?

3. What is the point of Chorukor?

4. In Act 2, Scene 7What does Ballas need help with?

5. What is Gross' response when Ballas asks him about Ptydepe in Act 2, Scene 9?

Essay Topics

Write an essay for ONE of the following topics:

Essay Topic 1

One of the writing techniques used by Havel is the repeated cycles he creates for the story. This is a way for an event or situation to be "recycled" in order to make a point. Describe in detail an example of how events were repeated for which characters. Were the events exactly the same as when they appeared originally in the play? If not, what was different about them? Why did Havel choose to make these changes? For each repeated event, also include the point Havel makes with it.

Essay Topic 2

Thumb is an essential part of the bureaucratic system, even though he seems largely unaware of it. What is his specific role in the play and in the larger theme of the story? Which character traits allow him to fulfill that role? What are the more serious dangers that Thumb represents a warning against?

Essay Topic 3

In Scene 5 of Act 1, an important point is made with the correlation between Gross' pursuit of knowledge (the translation of the memo) and his lack of knowledge. This creates a never ending circle where no logical way out exits for Gross.

1) Explain in detail what the significance of the knowledge is to the play in general, and in the scene specifically. Also, describe the irony of Gross' situation. What does the fact that he cannot answer the questions correctly symbolize? His lack of answers also displays a lack of something else. What is it and is why is it important to the point Havel is making about bureaucracy overall?

2) Staying with the theme of knowledge, which characters are allowed to have it? Do they really possess it, or is it only a perception portrayed to the characters that are kept from knowledge? Why is this necessary for the people to retain their power?

(see the answer keys)

This section contains 420 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy The Memorandum Lesson Plans
Copyrights
BookRags
The Memorandum from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook