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The Memorandum Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

This set of Lesson Plans consists of approximately 143 pages of tests, essay questions, lessons, and other teaching materials.
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Mid-Book Test - Hard

Name: _____________________________ Period: ___________________________

This quiz consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. What style of writing best describes The Memorandum?



2. Lear agrees to help Gross, only if he can show that his interest in Ptydepe is what?



3. What does Gross attempt to steal from Stroll's desk?



4. Why does Ballas tell Gross that the log book needs to be replaced?



5. At the beginning of the play, what kind of letter does Gross receive?



Short Essay Questions

1. What are two main issues that Gross has with Ptydepe in Act 1, Scene 1?



2. What do we notice right away about the relationship between Ballas and Pillar?



3. After all of the speculation throughout the play, what are the contents of Gross' memo revealed to be, and what effect does this have on him?



4. What is different about Gross and his approach in the very beginning of Act 2, Scene 10?



5. What are the noticeable habits of Hana, the secretary, that are displayed in the beginning of the play?



6. What is different about Thumb's responses in Act 2, Scene 8 as compared to earlier in the play?



7. What events lead Gross to speak out against the technological advances that are affecting humanity?



8. What are some more examples of Ballas' parallel experience to Gross' time as Managing Director that are given in the first part of Act 2, Scene 9?



9. How does Lear explain Ptydepe in describing the process for learning it?



10. What is ironic about the way the conversation between Gross and Ballas starts and the way it concludes, specifically concerning Gross' job?



Essay Topics

One of the writing techniques used by Havel is the repeated cycles he creates for the story. This is a way for an event or situation to be "recycled" in order to make a point. Describe in detail an example of how events were repeated for which characters. Were the events exactly the same as when they appeared originally in the play? If not, what was different about them? Why did Havel choose to make these changes? For each repeated event, also include the point Havel makes with it.

Manipulation is one of the main weapons used against Gross throughout the entire play. Using several examples from the play, describe in detail how Gross is manipulated on a variety of different levels. What is the objective of the manipulation? Why is it effective? Overall, why is manipulation necessary to the way a bureaucratic system functions? How does the play illustrate the way manipulation can lead to control over someone?

Havel introduces many forms of symbolism by using objects to illustrate his point.

1) Choose three different objects that are a form of symbolism and describe in detail what they represent. Include how they are used in the storyline and why they are effective. What is Havel trying to tell the audience with each of them?

2) Out of the examples you chose in the first section, are there any that are more important to the plot? What makes them more important? How do they fit into the overall theme and main point of the play?

(see the answer keys)

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