The Aeneid Test | Mid-Book Test - Hard

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Mid-Book Test - Hard

Name: _________________________ Period: ___________________

This test consists of 5 short answer questions, 10 short essay questions, and 1 (of 3) essay topics.

Short Answer Questions

1. Who calms the ocean so Aeneas and his men can make it safely to land?

2. Why does Venus at first think Juno's idea to have Dido and Aeneas marry and rule Carthage side by side is a bad one?

3. What is Coroebus' idea for how he, Aeneas, and their companions can pass to safety?

4. For whom does Aeneas return to Troy to search?

5. What does the fake Iulus make Dido forget?

Short Essay Questions

1. What reversals of fate has Helenus faced?

2. How has King Latinus' method of dealing with the war changed since Book VII?

3. How might Turnus be turning into a mini-Achilles (as predicted) in Book IX?

4. How does Anchises explain the process by which souls become reborn?

5. What does Dido ask her people to do and what does she personally vow to do before she committed suicide?

6. Describe the Harpies.

7. What does Evander tell Aeneas about Latin history?

8. Once Aeneas is definitely leaving, what disagreeable options lay before Dido that make death seem the best choice?

9. Which gods and goddesses are actually involved in the fall of Troy and what actions do they take?

10. What arguments does Sacës use to persuade Turnus to return to the fight?

Essay Topics

One of the main characteristics of epic poems such as The Aeneid (and The Iliad and The Odyssey) is that the poem starts "in medias res," or in the middle of the action. The narrative then reveals information about what came before through various means, such as characters telling tales of the past or the narrator providing background. Discuss how this work begins in the middle, what information the reader is eventually given about what happened before, how this information is provided, and what effect this structure has on the experience of reading the poem.

Virgil uses foreshadowing for reasons such as to introduce events he will discuss in greater detail later, to create suspense, and to kindle his audience's interest so they will continue to listen to the story. Identify three examples of foreshadowing in this work, explain how they work, and identify what Virgil's purpose might have been for using them.

Ultimately, how do you think Fate and Fortune work in the lives of any and all of the characters in The Aeneid? Use examples from the text to discuss issues such as:

1) How predetermined is fate and can it be changed? If so, by whom?

2) How are good or bad fortunes won?

3) How free or constrained are the gods and goddesses to act with or against fated outcomes?

(see the answer keys)

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