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Wine in the Wilderness Essay | Critical Essay #4

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Critical Essay #4

Because of their assimilation of mainstream values, Bill and his neighbors, Sonny-man and Cynthia, more concerned with black symbols, black discourse, and blackness in the abstract than in the concrete, disassociate themselves from blacks of lower socioeconomic status. Their classist disrespect for Oldtimer, who represents age, experience, and their ancestral past, exemplifies their detachment. In all the time they have known Oldtimer, never have they been genuinely interested enough to ask him his real name. His serving as their court fool and as an up-close example of how politically untogether poor, uneducated blacks can be, has militated against their recognition of his personhood. Similarly, the trio is interested in Tommy for her symbolic value, not for her real self. Voicing both class and regional bias, they view her as "the kinda woman that grates on your damn nerves . . . back-country . . . right outta the wilds of Mississippi," though she was...

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This section contains 917 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Wine in the Wilderness Study Guide
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Wine in the Wilderness from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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