Forgot your password?  
Study Guide

United States: Essays 1952-1992 - "Ford's Way" (1990) Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 162 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of United States.
This section contains 297 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our United States: Essays 1952-1992 Study Guide

"Ford's Way" (1990) Summary and Analysis

Vidal asserts that literary theory and those who purvey it, namely academics, has supplanted literature itself as the main focus of literary studies and that writers' lives, not their works, are of greatest interest to the public. He recounts his statement that the serious novel has lost its audience because it has been pushed off the stage by television and film as popular culture becomes ever more visual and semi-literate. In this environment, Vidal welcomes the publication of Ford Madox Ford by Alan Judd, "himself a lively writer with an attractive conversational style...who never bores."

Ford Madox Ford was born Hueffer in England in 1873, but the family later changed its name to Ford because of anti-Teutonic sentiment. Nevertheless, Ford/Hueffer was tall, blond and blue-eyed but "something about him was off-putting," according to Vidal...

(read more from the "Ford's Way" (1990) Summary)

This section contains 297 words
(approx. 1 page at 300 words per page)
Purchase our United States: Essays 1952-1992 Study Guide
Copyrights
United States: Essays 1952-1992 from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook