L.A. Meyer Writing Styles in Under the Jolly Roger: Being an Account of the Further Nautical Adventures of Jacky Faber

L.A. Meyer
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With only a few exceptions, the story is written in the first person from Jacky's perspective. These exceptions appear in the form of letters written by Jaimy. As the letters begin, he admits that he doesn't know where he should send them or whether Jacky will ever read them, but he does later give them to her. It's through these letters that the reader learns Jaimy had been at the races with his cousin rather than a new girlfriend, as Jacky believed. The reader is privy to this information though Jacky is not until near the end of the book. The use of first person means the reader has to be wary of the fact that Jacky is telling everything from her own point of view. This means the information could be skewed to suit her own purposes. An example of this is seen in the...

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This section contains 1,013 words
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Buy the Under the Jolly Roger: Being an Account of the Further Nautical Adventures of Jacky Faber Study Guide
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