The World's Great Speeches - United States and World Affairs Summary & Analysis

Lewis Copeland
This Study Guide consists of approximately 28 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The World's Great Speeches.
This section contains 501 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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United States and World Affairs Summary and Analysis

John Fitzgerald Kennedy, in his "Inaugural Address," says that his election should be celebrated as a symbol of freedom rather than a political victory. The next is Martin Luther King, Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. King's speech accuses America of having reneged on the promise of freedom and equal rights for Blacks. King's "dreams" include that black children will be able to stand side-by-side with white children of Alabama, that black men and women will be able to sit with the whites in brotherhood, and that the nation's creed, "that all men are created equal," will be true for blacks and whites. Dwight David Eisenhower, in his "Farewell Address" of 1961, says that the nation cannot be idle in times of peace and then rush to prepare in times of threat. He...

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This section contains 501 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The World's Great Speeches Study Guide
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