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The World's Great Speeches Chapter Summary & Analysis - United States and the Second World War Summary

Lewis Copeland
This Study Guide consists of approximately 36 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The World's Great Speeches.
This section contains 760 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The World's Great Speeches Study Guide

United States and the Second World War Summary and Analysis

In "Hemisphere Defense for Democracy," Franklin Delano Roosevelt says that Americans know the cost of war is high but that governments wage war anyway. He says that there is an absolute commitment to maintain the democratic government of the United States and that his greatest hope is for world peace, but insists that all this is worth nothing without a belief in God. In one of his famous "Fireside Chats," Roosevelt tells the American people of "The Arsenal of Democracy," which includes his belief that America is in danger from the escalating world crisis. While he says that staying out of the war is his goal, he warns that Hitler's goal is world domination. He says that America's only hope of having no direct involvement in the war is to support the nations...

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This section contains 760 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The World's Great Speeches Study Guide
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The World's Great Speeches from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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