Kobo Abe Writing Styles in The Woman in the Dunes

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The construction of The Woman in the Dunes includes many instances of irony. The overall ironic structure of the novel is that of the tables being turned on the protagonist. He hunts down and traps bugs for a hobby. And then he becomes like a bug, trapped in a hole in the sand. "He was lured on by the feeling that in all probability his prey was there, and he made his way down the gentle slope," the narrator relates in the beginning of the story. There are also many other examples of irony, most of them on a much smaller scale. A little later, the protagonist states that he was in "no special hurry," as he makes his way through the dunes before his capture. This is ironic because as soon as he realizes he is trapped, time weighs down on him almost to the point of...

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This section contains 1,157 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
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The Woman in the Dunes from Novels for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.