The Sixteen Satires Themes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 39 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Sixteen Satires.
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Ruin of Rome

One theme in Juvenal's Sixteen Satires is the ruin of Rome, and it is mentioned in every satire. In the first satire, Juvenal asserts that vice has never been more eminent, begging Romans to reform because their posterity will inherit their longings and vices. He claims that Romans are at the "ruinous zenith" of vices, justifying his condemnation of mankind. Satire two claims that the rest of the world mocks Romans for breeding "pansies," or homosexuals. In the third satire, Juvenal applauds Umbricius' decision to move to Cumae since anywhere is preferable to Rome. Umbricius furthers Juvenal's condemnation by his objection to Greek Romans who do not behave properly and his claim that, although he was born in Rome, he must leave Rome because he cannot lie as men in Rome do; his implicit claim is that the only way to remain a true Roman is...

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This section contains 1,225 words
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