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Juvenal Writing Styles in The Sixteen Satires

This Study Guide consists of approximately 49 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Sixteen Satires.
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Style

Point of View

The point of view in this collection of satires is mostly third person and limited. The point of view is not reliable since a lot of it refers to mythology instead of history. It is also very subjective, giving Juvenal's opinions about different aspects of life in Rome which is important since the collection of satires should do just that. This subjectivity allows the reader to become acquainted with Juvenal's views on landlords, adultery, patronage, honesty and many other topics. He often expresses his opinions by directing them at a specific person, many of whom are unknown though presumably they were real people.

The satires are mostly exposition, which could also be seen as monologues since Juvenal is usually addressing someone, with very little dialogue, with the exceptions of the third and ninth satires. In the third satire, Juvenal's friend, Umbricius, carries on a monologue by...

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This section contains 999 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Sixteen Satires Study Guide
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The Sixteen Satires from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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