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The Sixteen Satires - Satire III Summary & Analysis

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Satire III Summary

Juvenal applauds his friend's decision to move to lonely Cumae, because anywhere is preferable to Rome. After Umbricius, Juvenal's friend, packs to move, he and Juvenal discuss his reasons for moving. Umbricius plans to move because there is no room for decent professions; since he is not immoral, he cannot make a decent living. He objects to Greek Romans who do not act properly in Rome. Greek philosophers act as informers as well. Everyone lies and praises people for attributes that they do not have. Men are cross-dressers. Although Umbricius is a native-born Rome, he must leave Rome because he cannot lie as other men do. His humble efforts are no use because morals do not count. It is the same with court witnesses; trials are based more on the defendant's wealth than on their innocence or guilt.

Everyone mocks the poor so that people...

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This section contains 626 words
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