The Politics of Aristotle - Book 4: Chapter 2, Oligarchy, Tyranny & Deceit in Politics Summary & Analysis

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Book 4: Chapter 2, Oligarchy, Tyranny & Deceit in Politics Summary and Analysis

Once again, Aristotle brings up the Lacedaemonians for the purposes of instructive criticism. He explains that their constitution is mediocre and that they have many democratic qualities in their culture including public education, which is form of communal care of the young along with elected members of a Council of Elders and an Ephorate.

Later in the chapter Aristotle provides greater details regarding three of the most prevalent forms of tyranny. First he explains that both kings and tyrants are monarchs who rely upon personal power frequently combined with law. In tyranny, personal power and individuality hold sway, often irrespective of the law. When there is an absolute monarch, there is no underpinning of a law of the land, such a constitution and other laws. A good monarch is...

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This section contains 686 words
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Buy The Politics of Aristotle Study Guide
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