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The Politics of Aristotle Chapter Summary & Analysis - Book 1: Chapter 3, Acquiring Goods, Money-Lending Summary

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Book 1: Chapter 3, Acquiring Goods, Money-Lending Summary and Analysis

Aristotle divides the process of the acquisition of goods into natural and unnatural means.

He claims that acquiring what is needed is natural but that striving to accumulate more than what is needed is unnatural. He then takes an overview of how this is done in the greater world and society.

The philosopher notes the differences between the use of currency and methods of trading that do not rely upon this. He makes the the accurate observation that it is possible for people to have plenty of food and to still be "cash poor" but that under pressure this is a superior position to being food poor but cash rich. "Many who have coin have still starved," he explains. Aristotle states the case both in favor of and against currency and shows a clear grasp of the...

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This section contains 989 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Politics of Aristotle Study Guide
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The Politics of Aristotle from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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