The Dunwich Horror Symbols & Objects

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Whippoorwills

The author uses whippoorwills to symbolize nature's reaction to supernatural occurrences such as the existence of The Dunwich Horror and Wilbur Whatley. Beginning with Wilbur's (and presumably the Horror's) birth, the whippoorwills become noisy. This noise becomes louder and more intense as Wilbur and the Horror grow. Once the two are dead, the whippoorwills cease their noises, implying a return to the natural order.

The Sounds in the Hills

The author uses the sounds in the hills in a very similar way as he uses the whippoorwills, as a symbol of the response to supernatural occurrences. The rumblings in the hills begin with Wilbur and the Horror's birth and only become more noisy as they grow. These noises stop once the two die, as the unnaturalness has been wiped from the town.

Wilbur's/The Horror's Birth

The author uses Wilbur and the Horror's birth to act...

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This section contains 677 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Dunwich Horror Study Guide
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