Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited - Study Guide Foreword and Chapter 1 Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 60 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Speak, Memory.
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In the foreword, written in 1966, Vladimir Nabokov describes the process by which he wrote Speak, Memory, explaining how the autobiographical novel is culled from essays on his life, which he wrote for various publications. Chapter Five is the first recorded work, published in French in 1936, under the name "Mademoiselle O," and later translated and published by The Atlantic Monthly in 1943. The rest of the chapters emerge similarly and are published separately, mainly by The New Yorker, between 1948 and 1951. He collects the essays and releases the full work under the name Conclusive Evidence, in America, and Speak, Memory in England.

In 1953, during the writing of both Lolita and Pnin, Nabakov translates Speak, Memory into Russian. During this process, he revises the work, making additions and amendments. He later uses both translations to shape the current work, a process, which he calls a...

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This section contains 870 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited Study Guide
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Speak, Memory: An Autobiography Revisited from Nonfiction Classics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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