Philip Roth Writing Styles in Sabbath's Theater

This Study Guide consists of approximately 66 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Sabbath's Theater.
This section contains 872 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Sabbath's Theater Study Guide

Point of View

Sabbath's Theater is written as if it were in the third person with an omniscient narrator. However, the third person narrator is actually Sabbath in disguise. The book reads as if Sabbath were speaking of himself in the third person, which makes sense when one considers that Sabbath's entire life has been a show. As the author of the play, he narrates it himself and plays the lead role. The story is not a true autobiography and would lose some of its power if Sabbath narrated in the first person. Sabbath is not merely recounting the story of his life. His life is a story, a show he has created to entertain the audience.

Sabbath's point of view as a narrator is highly unreliable. The other characters in the book, seen through the rheumy lens of Sabbath's depravity, are portrayed as living jokes. Their deepest hopes...

(read more)

This section contains 872 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Sabbath's Theater Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Sabbath's Theater from BookRags. (c)2014 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook