Forgot your password?  

Literary Precedents for Maggie: A Girl of the Streets

This Study Guide consists of approximately 69 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Maggie.
This section contains 375 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Maggie: A Girl of the Streets Study Guide

Literary Precedents

Framing discussions of morality in slum settings was very popular in the late 1800s. Many authors sought to make morality plays out of poverty living.

Other authors sought to stir the social conscience of the more affluent society to improve living conditions in the slums.

The Frenchman, Emile Zola, is often credited as the first important Naturalist writer, publishing L'Assommoir in the 1870s. Although there is no evidence that Crane had read Zola, the story lines between L'Assowmoirand Maggie are similiar.

A more likely source for Crane would have been the very popular sermons, published in all of the New York papers, by Thomas DeWitt Talmage. They covered the vices of drinking (the Johnson parents' problem passed down to Jimmie), the dissolute dance (the ever sleazier beer gardens), and the sweat shops (Maggie's sewing factory). In Talmage's sermons the vices are terrible but the lack of mercy toward...

(read more from the Literary Precedents section)

This section contains 375 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Maggie: A Girl of the Streets Study Guide
Copyrights
Maggie: A Girl of the Streets from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook