Study Guide

The Lord of the Rings Historical Context

This Study Guide consists of approximately 140 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Lord of the Rings.
This section contains 1,239 words
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Introduction

Tolkien is often approached with the expectation that he was a typical child of late Victorian and Edwardian England, and deeply embedded in the British intellectual establishment. He was in some ways, however, atypical. His Catholicism, passion for Philology, profound love and respect for the earth, and distrust of the benefits of technology, particularly that of the internal combustion engine, made him a potentially uneasy member of his society. Even as the atomic bomb was being developed, the Ring was emerging in his narrative as the technology that cannot be harnessed, but must be destroyed, the source of unlimited power that corrupts and destroys even the best and highest. His picture of the Shire, which works as a society because justice and law are internalized rather than imposed, while admittedly ideal, is an ideal that has more in common with the Jeffersonian ideal of democracy than Imperial...

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This section contains 1,239 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Lord of the Rings Study Guide
Copyrights
Epics for Students
The Lord of the Rings from Epics for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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