Letters from a Stoic Epistulae Morales Ad Lucilium - Letters XXXIII, XXXVIII, XL, XLI, XLVI, XLVII, XLVIII Summary & Analysis

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Letters XXXIII, XXXVIII, XL, XLI, XLVI, XLVII, XLVIII Summary and Analysis

Letter XXXIII: Seneca responds to Lucilius' request that he include Stoic aphorisms in his letters. Unlike other philosophers, he says, the Stoics did not write in a manner that easily lends itself to quotation. The quality of the writing and thought is generally so high that it is hard to distinguish one sentence or passage as exceptionally brilliant. In any case, one ought not to lean too much on the sayings of others. While memorizing aphorisms suits a young man, as he matures he should be the one who makes sayings for others to quote.

Letter XXXVIII: Seneca agrees with Lucilius that they ought to write one another more frequently. Unrehearsed communication, like talking or letter-writing, is more communicative than prepared speeches or lectures and, therefore, is...

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This section contains 540 words
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