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Compare & Contrast The Kentucky Cycle by Robert Schenkkan

Robert Schenkkan
This Study Guide consists of approximately 118 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Kentucky Cycle.
This section contains 618 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
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Compare & Contrast

1700s-1800s: Women do not have any rights under the law. Women can be raped by their husbands, have no rights to the property or money they may have earned, and their children belong to their husbands.

1920: The 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gives women the right to vote in local, county, state, and federal elections.

Today: While women today still earn less than their male counterparts for equal work, the gap is narrowing and laws against sexual harassment and gender discrimination are being enforced.

1700s: Slavery is common in the early years of the United States. Kentucky is a "slave state," but it does not secede from the Union during the Civil War. Owners routinely father children by their female slaves and consider those offspring slaves as well. Families are often broken up and sold to different people, especially as punishment for misbehavior.

1960s...

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This section contains 618 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our The Kentucky Cycle Study Guide
Copyrights
The Kentucky Cycle from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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