Forgot your password?  

Jeeves Takes Charge Essay | Critical Essay #3

This Study Guide consists of approximately 118 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Jeeves Takes Charge.
This section contains 5,077 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Jeeves Takes Charge Study Guide

Critical Essay #3

Friedrich Nietzsche's concept of the superman— a self-created hero and a natural leader— influenced a number of British writers during the early twentieth century, most notably D. H. Lawrence and George Bernard Shaw. In the following essay, Spath argues that Jeeves represents one of the best examples of the superman in popular literature.

There can hardly be any doubt that the most intriguing character created by P. G. Wodehouse is that of butler Jeeves, even though, as the clever servant who, episode after episode, proves superior to his master, he is anything but original. From the viewpoint of literary history he is indeed of as ancient a family as that hopelessly inefficient rich young man whom he serves. The extraordinary fascination Jeeves has held for a vast number of readers invites some investigation of how his author made use of one of the stock figures of...

(read more from the Critical Essay #3 section)

This section contains 5,077 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Jeeves Takes Charge Study Guide
Copyrights
Jeeves Takes Charge from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook