Cynthia Voigt Writing Styles in Jackaroo

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The story is told from the third-person and limited point of view. Though the reader sees the events through Gwyn's eyes, the third-person narration allows us to see these events as objectively presented, and eliminates the possibility of an unreliable narrative. This makes the social injustices of the setting all the more enraging, as we both understand the objective reality and Gwyn's response to it. Furthermore, the limited narration makes Gwyn's actions seem reasonable and even inevitable for the reader: as we become further enmeshed in her world we see the Jackaroo disguise as one of her only means of escape, and the narrative encourages the reader's support of Gwyn's antics. However, because the narration is limited, it also allows for surprises and even shocks. When the group is lost in the blizzard, the reader cannot know if Burl and the Lord are safe, as Gwyn...

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This section contains 930 words
(approx. 3 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Jackaroo Study Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Jackaroo from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.