Forgot your password?  

In the American Grain - The Discovery of Kentucky Summary & Analysis

This Study Guide consists of approximately 141 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of In the American Grain.
This section contains 729 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our In the American Grain Study Guide

The Discovery of Kentucky Summary

Opening with gratitude for the birth of "the great voluptuary," Daniel Boone, Williams describes the conditions and attitudes of the settlers. He continues his evaluation of the people as "niggardly" and likens them to a "withering plague." He then describes their suffering, their looking toward the west with fear, and, at the same time, their residual experience with savagery that kept them from venturing beyond the Appalachians. Boone was born into this atmosphere, he continues, a frontiersman and pioneer like none other of his day. The writer then challenges the mistaken impressions of Boone's character, refuting impressions of him as "that riff-raff of hunters . . . a link between the savage and the settler." Instead, Williams writes, Boone was mild, simple-hearted, steady, not impulsive in courage, and not like the others: that "wretched"...

(read more from the The Discovery of Kentucky Summary)

This section contains 729 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our In the American Grain Study Guide
Copyrights
In the American Grain from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook