In the American Grain - Study Guide Cotton Mather’s “Wonders of the Invisible World” Summary & Analysis

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In poetic adulation, Williams writes about Sir Walter Raleigh after the fact. That is, he writes in a voice that bemoans the regulations and restrictions the queen put upon him, and speaks to Raleigh directly. He empathizes with Raleigh, describing how the queen used him, directed his affairs, yanked him out of wars, and prevented his venturing to the colonies. After implying that Virginia was settled because of him and named after him in his absence, Williams then sings Raleigh's praises. He finishes the essay by asking Raleigh important questions, the kind a historian would ask a long-deceased hero or celebrity. In closing, the author questions him "in hell, where he has gone," through the Muse he conjures, asking for Raleigh to clarify "the reasons for that last blow," to explain why he sent his son to the "...

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This section contains 512 words
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