Forgot your password?  

In the American Grain Chapter Summary & Analysis - The Fountain of Eternal Youth Summary

This Study Guide consists of approximately 141 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of In the American Grain.
This section contains 563 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our In the American Grain Study Guide

The Fountain of Eternal Youth Summary

Introducing the essay with commentary on history, Williams points to a new definition: "History begins for us," he says, "with murder and enslavement, not with discovery." In a vociferous storytelling or lecturing tone, he begins by telling how when Ponce's plantations suffered because of a lack of slaves, he petitioned, successfully, for a royal patent to get some more. Permitted to seek out slaves in the Caribs, Ponce headed out. Taking creative license, the writer describes the arrival, mayhem, and slaughter at the first landing in Guadeloupe. As if he was a witness, Williams depicts the naked savages carrying off Ponce's laundresses in their teeth, getting shot in the chest, taking off with Ponce's cherished dog, "of whom he thought more . . . than a population."

The narrator speaks through the invaders, justifying that the...

(read more from the The Fountain of Eternal Youth Summary)

This section contains 563 words
(approx. 2 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our In the American Grain Study Guide
Copyrights
In the American Grain from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook