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Jack Abbott Writing Styles in In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison

This Study Guide consists of approximately 35 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of In the Belly of the Beast.
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Style

Perspective

Abbott is speaking from the perspective of a state-raised convict, a long-term inmate who has seen all aspects of prison, including maximum security facilities, psychiatric facilities, and solitary confinement cells. Abbott makes the distinction between the short-term prisoner and someone like himself, who has been in and out (mostly in) of prison since he was twelve. Abbott feels that the state-raised convict is more qualified to speak about the essence of prison than someone who has only done a few years, for the true effect of prison on a man's body, soul, and mind only manifests itself after perhaps five years or more.

He feels he is particularly qualified to speak about the American prison system. Unlike many others he has observed, he has not lost his mind nor been indoctrinated or "brainwashed" by the oppressive prison system. He remains lucid and has maintained a critical distance from...

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This section contains 758 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison Study Guide
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In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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