In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison Setting & Symbolism

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Indoctrination

In Abbott's view, indoctrination is the process whereby prisoners are forced to admit they are in prison because of their own bad behavior and that prisoners deserve any punishment doled out in prison by guards or the system. Abbott flatly rejects indoctrination. He will not admit that he did anything to be locked up, and any violence he commits behind bars is not his fault but the result of a brutal prison system.

Claustrophobia

Abbott suffered from claustrophobia for three or four years while in prison. He felt the walls were crushing and smothering him; he couldn't breathe, and he flailed wildly and screamed. Prison guards tied him down to bed every night to "cure" him of this condition.

Blackout cell

Abbott was confined to a blackout cell once for about 25 days. Absolutely no light reached him inside the cell. He was fed once a day with...

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This section contains 679 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison Study Guide
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