In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison - Foreign Affairs, and, Freedom? Summary & Analysis

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Foreign Affairs: Communist revolution depends upon the alliance of the peasant with the worker. Every Communist revolution in any part of the world brings the world closer to its ideal state, a world revolution where capitalism is overthrown. The Communist superpowers, China and the Soviet Union, may play a role in this revolution, should they assist lesser nations with their revolutions.

Abbott admires Russia for two reasons. Its citizens express a great suffering in humanity which moves Abbott. Also, he feels very close to Lenin and his associates through reading all about them, and he dreams of a day when he might join with fellow Communists to change history, as Lenin did.

Abbott has read books by Alexander Solzhenitsyn and considers him a traitor to his people. The Soviet "gulag" system Solzhenitsyn is credited with exposing is in fact a more humane system than the...

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This section contains 473 words
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Buy the In the Belly of the Beast: Letters from Prison Study Guide
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