Here I Stand: a Life of Martin Luther - Behemoth, Leviathan, and the Great Waters Summary & Analysis

Roland Bainton
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The Peasants' War results in increased levies on the land, imperiled commons, and a deflated economy. Even though the peasants present petitions to their rulers, they never are able to forestall the reoccurence of their mistreatment. Ironically, the initiative for the retaliation of grievances comes not from the oppressed, but from the more wealthy and enterprising. The goals have more to do with politics than economics. They want all government to be abolished except the pope and emperor. The battle is against overlords, bishops, knights, and princes.

This movement is affected by the Reformation. Peasants feel drawn to Luther. Catholic princes claim Luther is responsible for the uprising. Luther writes a verdict on the demands of the peasants, The Twelve Articles. Luther states that the gospel is not the reason for the rebellion and disturbance...

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This section contains 475 words
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Buy the Here I Stand: a Life of Martin Luther Study Guide
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