Here I Stand: a Life of Martin Luther - The Appeal to Caesar Summary & Analysis

Roland Bainton
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The Appeal to Caesar Summary and Analysis

Luther responds to the bull saying he is not worried because nothing can happen except for what God above allows to happen. Luther appeals in vain to the pope and to a council. It should be noted, however, that he does not neglect to come to his own defense.

Luther believes that God can speak through any righteous man—not just the pope. The pope is not the only one who can interpret Scripture. Furthermore, Luther thinks that the income of the Church should be curtailed so spiritual concerns are focused upon, not temporal possessions.

The pope is shamed by a comparison with Christ. There is an illustrated work in the library of Frederick the Wise in which Christ washes the disciples' feet while the pope has his feet kissed.

The bull Exsurge Domine...

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This section contains 402 words
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Buy the Here I Stand: a Life of Martin Luther Study Guide
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