Forgot your password?  

A Guide to Berlin Essay & Criticism

This Study Guide consists of approximately 63 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of A Guide to Berlin.
This section contains 1,047 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our A Guide to Berlin Study Guide

Critical Overview

The original publication of "A Guide to Berlin" (as "Putevoditel' po Berlinu") in a Russian-language newspaper for the Russian expatriate community in Berlin virtually guaranteed that Nabokov's fourteenth published story would receive little initial critical attention. By 1930, however, Nabokov's first three novels— Mashenka, Korol', dama, valet, and Zashchita Luzhina—had established Nabokov's literary reputation, and he decided to gather his early stories into the collection Vozvrashchenie Chorba (1929, translated as The Return of Chorb). Writing to a friend in 1930, Nabokov described "A Guide to Berlin" as the best story in the collection, but contemporary reviewers preferred the title story, written in the same year as "A Guide to Berlin," about the loss of a lover. As Nabokov's reputation grew with the publication of such works as Priglashenie na Kazn' (1938, Invitation to a Beheading) and Lolita (1955), critics continued to ignore "A Guide to Berlin" in favor of the...

(read more from the Critical Overview section)

This section contains 1,047 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our A Guide to Berlin Study Guide
Copyrights
A Guide to Berlin from BookRags and Gale's For Students Series. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook