Even Cowgirls Get the Blues Themes & Social Concerns

This Study Guide consists of approximately 40 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Even Cowgirls Get the Blues.
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Like Another Roadside Attraction (1971), Even Cowgirls Get the Blues expresses its social concern through the theme of personal freedom. One of the main plot lines involves the takeover of the Rubber Rose ranch, a women's health farm owned by a cosmetic and feminine hygiene company. Bonanza Jellybean and a group of cowgirls intend to turn the dude ranch into a working one. Their action is a form of social protest against a society which allows girls to wear cowgirl outfits only until they reach puberty, against a society which limits the roles available to women. In the course of the novel, Sissy Hankshaw arrives at the Rubber Rose. Sissy, who works as a model for the same cosmetic concern, was born with huge thumbs which she uses for hitching rides across the country. Like the dissident cowgirls, Sissy's deviation from the norm has...

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This section contains 394 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Even Cowgirls Get the Blues Study Guide
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Even Cowgirls Get the Blues from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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