Truman Capote Writing Styles in Breakfast at Tiffany's

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The story is told from the first-person point of view by an unnamed narrator who is in the midst of the action. He is looking back at the story from some time and distance, so it's obvious that he's older and wiser than when the story took place. The narrator is an open-minded and innocent character, and this helps him to be involved with more of the characters. The other characters trust the narrator, telling him things that are important to the plot and character development of the story.

Occasionally, the narrator interjects his own thoughts, feelings, and comments into the story, reminding readers that the events of the story are in the past, but that the influence of these events still affects the narrator's life. The narrator's feelings about other characters color the reader's feelings. For example, he Is skeptical of Rusty Trawler because of...

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This section contains 777 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Breakfast at Tiffany's Study Guide
Copyrights
Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults
Breakfast at Tiffany's from Beacham's Encyclopedia of Popular Fiction and Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.