Bliss Criticism

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The story "Bliss" was first published in The English Review in 1920. Later that year, it became the title story for Mansfield's second collection, Bliss, and Other Stories. The story (and the volume) helped solidify Mansfield's reputation as an important contemporary writer.

Many early reviewers lauded the collection and Mansfield's unique narrative voice. Conrad Aiken, in a review for Freeman, called Mansfield "brilliant" and remarked upon her "infinitely inquisitive sensibility." Several reviewers drew a parallel between Mansfield's work and that of the Russian writer Anton Chekhov. Aiken noted this similarity but also countered any claims that Mansfield "borrowed" from Chekhov: "One has not read a page of Miss Mansfield's book before one has said 'Chekhov'; but one has not read two pages before Chekhov is forgotten."

Malcolm Cowley also commented on the resemblance to Chekhov. He deemed the collection to be a "voyage of adventure" filled with Mansfield's "own...

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This section contains 714 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy the Bliss Study Guide
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Short Stories for Students
Bliss from Short Stories for Students. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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