Bleak House Quotes

This Study Guide consists of approximately 46 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Bleak House.
This section contains 443 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)

"forget your worldly arts and play with me," p. 45.

"The universe," he observed, "makes rather an indifferent parent," p. 45.

"The weather is so very bad, down in Lincolnshire, that the liveliest imagination can scarcely apprehend its ever being fine again," p. 50.

"Come night, come darkness, for you cannot come too soon, or stay too long, by such a place as this!" p. 93.

"The Augurs of the Detective Temple invariably predict, that when Mr. Bucket and that finger are in much conference, a terrible avenger will be heard of before long," p. 437.

"the law is so despotic here, that it interferes to prevent any of our good English citizens from being troubled, even by a lady's visits, against his desire," p. 362.

"They said there could be no East wind where Somebody was; they said that wherever Dame Durden went, there was sunshine and summer air," p. 262.

"Thrown on the wide world, doom'd to wander and roam,
Bereft of his parents, bereft of a home," p. 269.

"It is night in Lincoln's Inn—perplexed and troublous valley of the shadow of the law, where suitors generally find but little day—and fat candles are snuffed out in offices, and clerks have rattled down the crazy wooden stairs, and dispersed," p. 272.

"From tiers of staircase windows, clogged lamps like the eyes of Equity, bleared Argus with a fathomless pocket for every eve and an eye upon it, dimly blink at the stars," p. 272.

"It is a line steaming night to turn the slaughterhouses, the unwholesome trades, the sewerage, bad water, and burial-grounds to account, and give the Registrar of Deaths sortie extra business," p. 273.

"One disagreeable result of whispering is, that it seems to evoke an atmosphere of silence, haunted by the ghosts of sound—strange cracks and tickings, the rustling of garments that have no substance in them, and the tread of dreadful feet, that would leave no mark on the sea-sand or the winter snow," p. 278.

"Call the death by any name Your Highness will, attribute it to whom you will, or say it might have been prevented how you will. it is the same death eternally—inborn, inbred, engendered in the corrupted humours of the vicious body itself, and that only—Spontaneous Combustion, and none other of all the deaths that can be died," p. 280.

"It is, that he cannot have too little to do with people who are too deep for him, and cannot be too careful of interference with matters he does not understand; that the plain rule, is to do nothing in the dark, to be a party to nothing underhanded or mysterious, and never to put his foot where he cannot see the ground," p. 238.

This section contains 443 words
(approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page)
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