Study Guide

Richard Francis Burton Writing Styles in The Arabian Nights

This Study Guide consists of approximately 123 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of The Arabian Nights.
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Frames

The Arabian Nights is a collection of stories within stories, also known as "frames." One narrator's story contains or frames another narrator's story. The outer or first frame is the story of the King who, in revenge for the infidelity of his first wife, marries a new maiden every night, takes her virginity, and slays her in the morning. This frame contains the second frame of Scheherazade's story. In order to preserve her life, Scheherazade tells a seemingly endless story, and in her story, characters begin to tell their stories (additional frames). The convention of having a narrator tell the story of other narrators telling stories is seen in such works as Dante's Divine Comedy, Boccaccio's Decameron, and Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

Medieval or Archaic Language

Burton's translation is especially characterized by an ornate, archaic language style that he developed in order to imitate the medieval Arabic in...

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This section contains 1,440 words
(approx. 4 pages at 400 words per page)
Buy The Arabian Nights Study Guide
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Gale
The Arabian Nights from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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