Study Guide

Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood - Chapter 126, Aphrodite Summary & Analysis

Merlin Stone
This Study Guide consists of approximately 82 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood.
This section contains 169 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood Study Guide

Chapter 126, Aphrodite Summary and Analysis

Aphrodite is initially regarded as a multifaceted Goddess concerned mostly with prophesies and battles. It is the Hellenic Greeks that come to regard Aphrodite as the essence of erotic love. Herodotus writes that Aphrodite was introduced to Greece by the Phoenicians of Canaan. The Greeks referred to the shrines of Ashtart as belonging to Aphrodite. Perhaps it is this connection that caused the shift in Aphrodite's image—because of the sexual rituals associated with Ashtart and Ishtar in Canaan and Babylon. It is interesting to note that the Romans knew Aphrodite as Venus, the sacred star of Ashtart, Ishtar, and Inanna.

Adonis is Aphrodite's son and lover whose life is taken very early. He is wounded by a wild boar, and his blood colors the poppies in the Cyprian Troodos Mountains. Just as in the temples of Ashtart...

(read more from the Chapter 126, Aphrodite Summary)

This section contains 169 words
(approx. 1 page at 400 words per page)
Buy the Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood Study Guide
Copyrights
BookRags
Ancient Mirrors of Womanhood from BookRags. (c)2016 BookRags, Inc. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook